Art and Dementia Program
Bob and Jill Hannan
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UNLOCKING EXPRESSION: Art and Dementia Program Returns to Maitland

Maitland Regional Art Gallery (MRAG) is set to resume its Art and Dementia program in February.

The free initiative aims to foster connections and conversation through creativity for individuals living with dementia.

Scheduled twice a month the program invites participants and their caregivers on a 90-minute artistic exploration of the gallery’s current exhibitions.

Led by seasoned facilitators, the Art and Dementia sessions leverage art as a catalyst for dialogue and self-expression, creating an environment where participants can share their thoughts and emotions in a supportive setting. The program is thoughtfully designed to actively combat social isolation, providing an invaluable opportunity for those living with dementia and their caregivers to engage and connect.

“We know how socially isolating it can be for people living with dementia and their families and carers. The gallery provides a space for people to come together and share their experiences,” MRAG Art Director Gerry Bobsie said.

“At MRAG, art is a gateway for wellbeing and can help to unlock memory and emotions and create meaningful exchanges between people.”

Art and Dementia Program

The initiative encourages participants to engage with art in a meaningful way, fostering a sense of community and shared creativity.

“My husband Bill and I have been coming to the Art and Dementia program at Maitland Regional Art Gallery since its inception in 2011,” Participant Jill Hannan said.

“We both love connecting with this beautiful gallery and meeting other people in the community who are also on their journey either experiencing dementia, or caring for someone with dementia.

“It’s a very inspiring and creative program we both look forward to each month.”

All dates for the 2024 program have been confirmed and are open for reservations, free of charge. To secure a spot and get all the details about the program visit mait.city/ArtandDementia.