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National Science Week heads online with a STACKED 2020 program

Are you curious about how to spot a deep fake video? Ever wondered how many rubber bands it takes to implode a watermelon? Are you intrigued about what kinds of food we will be eating in the decades to come?

Well, you’re in luck because all those questions and more will be answered with National Science Week’s massive 2020 program.

Running from August 15-23, National Science Week has been a thing since 1997 and last year around 1.2 million people took part in more than 2100 events.

This year, with the pandemic still very much a part of life, many of the events will be held online meaning anyone can take part no matter where they live.

Below are just a few of the program highlights that have piqued our scientific interest, but make sure you head here to check out the full program.

Taste Tomorrow: fake meat, sauteed spider and lobster lollies?

Taste Tomorrow invites you to taste the future of food right now by ordering a mystery box of sustainable and nutritious goodies. Attend one of the online live events and open the box together with scientists, nutritionists and chefs to explore how the food rates for taste, sustainability and nutrition.

Poor diets are a major cause of health, economic and environmental problems that every country experience. We invite you to question the experts on their proposed food security solutions and explore how to eat sustainably for a healthy mind, body and planet.

Indigenous Science Experience

What can Aboriginal astronomy tell us about the night sky? How is our native flora used as bush medicine? What can we learn about sustainable living from 60 000+ years of Indigenous culture? Find out the answers to these questions and more during the Indigenous Science Experience.

The Indigenous Science Experience consists of a series of online presentations showcasing a wide range of Indigenous and Western science presented by Indigenous secondary students, Elders and community members and science outreach providers.

CSIRO National Science Week Challenge

To celebrate National Science Week, the CSIRO is challenging all Australians to find out what connects them to the ocean, wherever they live. From taking photos of local waterways to designing and building a water filter, you can explore your connection to the ocean as deeply as you’d like.

Head here to learn more, be inspired and get involved. Get involved at and watch the Challenge video.

Requiem for a Reef

Artist Ngaio Fitzpatrick and composer Alexander Hunter explore the fragility of
the Great Barrier Reef through sculpture, music, and Q&A with scientists, live-streamed from Canberra Glassworks.

The evening will consist of a performance, followed by a Q&A with Ngaio Fitzpatrick and other experts in climate change

For more information on the multitude of other great National Science Week happenings and for a full program, head here.

Written by Newcastle Live

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